Win XP

Does an easy method of creating multiple Service Configurations exist?

 

Introduction

Would you like to have an easy method to tweak your Systems Services with little or no risk? That is what this page is here for. You can create multiple hardware profiles for the purpose of testing different services configurations. Ensure you read all instructions provided and the Pro's and Con's at the bottom of this page.

This page is here to assist those people that are worried about breaking their computer. As such, hardware profiles are not "really" required for the "safe" configuration or "Internet Gateway" as it is very easy to place the changed services back to the default value. This information assists people with testing out "Gaming" and "Bare-bones " configurations with the knowledge that "default is a reboot away." Having that security is a good thing.

Items to think about

 

  • Ensure that, if you own a USB keyboard, it will work with hardware profiles by creating one and rebooting to see if you can navigate the options menu.
  • Adjusting a service directly (in the General Tab) effects all hardware profiles and users.
  • Adjusting a service using hardware profiles effects all user accounts.
  • Ensure that you look at the "Started" column to see which services are running in any particular profile.
  • With hardware profiles, there is no "Manual" option located in the "Log On Tab." Services that are set to "Manual" globally (General Tab) will remain that way unless changed globally or in the hardware profiles to "disable."
  • If the service is set to Automatic or Manual by default or recommended to place it into Automatic or Manual, leave it at "Enabled" in the hardware profiles "Log On Tab."
  • If you desire a service to be set to Automatic, from Manual or Disabled, place it that way globally (in the general tab) and then enable it via the profiles on test tweaking setups.
  • Something I have not tried is if, in a particular hardware profile, the System Restore Service is "Disabled," whether or not it deletes previous restore points or just does not create more for that profile.
  • Two services you cannot disable with this method are Event Log and Plug and Play.
  • The service that you CAN disable and will cause your system to become unbootable is Remote Procedure Call. Do not disable RPC via the hardware profiles method or any other method.

 

Pro's

 

  • The ability to tweak your system with little or no risk.
  • Multiple configurations for different tasks or users.

Con's

 

  • Tweaking your computer's performance may become addictive. :)

1) Shall we begin? (Image 1.1)

 

Start --> Control Panel


Head to: Start --> Control Panel.

2) Control Panel: (Image 1.2)

 

Performance and Maintenance


In the Control Panel, select Performance and Maintenance.

3) Performance and Maintenance Panel: (Image 1.3)

 

System


In the Performance and Maintenance Panel, select System.

4) System Properties: (Image 1.4)

 

System Properties Dialog


System Properties Dialog will appear.

Select the Hardware tab, then click the Hardware Profiles button near the bottom.

5) Hardware Profiles Dialog: (Image 1.5)

 

Hardware Profiles Dialog


The Hardware Profiles Dialog will be displayed.

Your current profile (Profile 1) needs to be copied.

Select the profile to highlight and then select the Copy button.

6) Name Your Profile: (Image 1.6)

 

Confirmation screen


Using my Windows XP Services Configuration as a guide, choose a name that is appropriate.
I used "Default" here.

7) Copy and Rename Your Profiles: (Image 1.7)

 

No partitions have been previously defined


Continue to copy a profile and name them appropriately.

Here, I used:

Default, Safe, Internet Gateway, Gaming, and Super Tweak.

Please note: under usual circumstances, unless you are using "Internet Connection Sharing" to provide your network with internet access, you can skip the Internet Gateway Configuration. If you are using ICS, you could substitute the "Internet Gateway" Configuration for "Safe."

8) Example Naming Scheme: (Image 1.8)

 

Continue to create partitions 

 

Your Hardware Profiles could look something like this:

When finished, select OK on the Hardware Profiles Dialog and System Properties.

9) Administrative Tools: (Image 1.9)

 

Administrative Tools


After creating as many Hardware Profiles as you wish, select Administrative Tools in the Performance and Maintenance Panel.

10) Services Panel: (Image 1.10)

 

Select Services


In Administrative Tools, select Services.

 

11) Services Properties Dialog: (Image 1.11)

 

General Tab


Double click each service to bring up the Services Properties Dialog.

Using the standard method in the "General Tab," if you Disable a service, it is "forever" Disabled for every hardware profile and every user.

Instead, use the "Log On" tab.

12) Using the Log On Tab: (Image 1.12)

 

Log On


Select the Log On tab.

Using my Windows XP Services Configuration as a guide, select each service and Enable or Disable them in each profile by selecting the profile and choosing the proper button.

Do not adjust your "Default" or "Profiles 1" configuration.

Please understand:

  • If a service is listed as "Automatic or Manual," leave the hardware profile as "Enable."
  • If a service is listed as "Disabled," change the hardware profile to "Disable."

13) Reboot: (Image 1.13)

 

Reboot


After all services have been adjusted, reboot your system.

14) Example Boot Menu: (Image 1.14)

 

Hardware Profile


In a few seconds, the "Hardware Profile" screen will be displayed allowing you to choose which service configuration you wish to boot.

You are done!

So what about Service Pack 1, 2 and 3?

 
Before the install/reinstallation of Windows XP, I highly recommend that you download Service Pack 3 "for multiple computers" and burn it onto a CD. The download is approximately 316.4MB. If you choose not to do this step, your system could become infected with a virus or worm exploiting the vulnerabilities that Service Pack 3 fixes. I also recommend that you do NOT have your system connected to the Internet until after the installation of Service Pack 3. This means that you cannot activate your XP installation during setup, but you can accomplish that task following a reboot after Service Pack 3 is installed.


Service Pack 3


After installing Service Pack 3 on different configurations, I have found the following:

  • The Default and "Safe" Service configurations for Windows XP Home and Pro work just fine while installing Service Pack 3.

What I did do:

  • I installed Service Pack 3 "for multiple computers". I did not use Automatic Update to accomplish the task. The complete download is about 316.4MB. If I tested multiple computers with the Autoupdate installation, it would take more time than what I would enjoy spending.
What I am not going to do:
  • Predict on an individual basis whether Service Pack 3 "will work for you."
  • Test whether or not System Restore will "undo" Service Pack 3 or if you will be able to go back to a previous install point before Service Pack 3 installation. My guess is "No, you cannot."

With that said, this is my recommendations:

  • No matter what, I would recommend to install SP3. If for nothing else, the knowledge that all of the "security" updates are current, not to mention the "bug" fixes and several updates not offered through auto update.
  • Back up everything you cannot afford to lose.
  • Contact Microsoft for any Technical issues that arise with the Service Pack 3. I do not work for them. I do not have a direct line to them. They can answer and fix your problems much faster than I.


Service Pack 2


After installing Service Pack 2 on different configurations, I have found the following:

  • The Default and "Safe" Service configurations for Windows XP Home and Pro work just fine while installing Service Pack 2.
  • A minimal amount of services (eight) running on automatic also work fine as long as Cryptographic Service is running.

What I did do:

  • I installed Service Pack 2 "for multiple computers". I did not use Automatic Update to accomplish the task. The complete download is about 272MB. If I tested multiple computers with the Autoupdate installation, it would take more time than what I would enjoy spending.

What I am not going to do:

  • Predict on an individual basis whether Service Pack 2 "will work for you."
  • Test whether or not System Restore will "undo" Service Pack 2 or if you will be able to go back to a previous install point before Service Pack 2 installation. My guess is "No, you cannot."

With that said, this is my recommendations:

  • No matter what, I would recommend to install SP2. If for nothing else, the knowledge that all of the "security" updates are current, not to mention the "bug" fixes.
  • Back up everything you cannot afford to lose.
  • Contact Microsoft for any Technical issues that arise with the Service Pack 2. I do not work for them. I do not have a direct line to them. They can answer and fix your problems much faster than I.


Service Pack 1


After installing Service Pack 1 on different configurations, I have found the following:

  • The Default, "Safe" and "Internet Gateway" Service configurations for Windows XP Home and Pro work just fine while installing Service Pack 1.
  • A minimal amount of services (eight) running on automatic also work fine.
  • Cryptographic service is required to install SP1.
  • If you "archive" or keep the ability to "uninstall" SP1, you will require 130 to 400 MB of disk space.

What I did do:

  • I installed Service Pack 1 from a "full" or "network" download. Not the Express. The full is about 137 MB. If I tested multiple computers with the "Express" installation, it would take weeks.

What I am not going to do:

  • Install SP1 from an "Express" download.
  • Predict on an individual basis whether Service Pack 1 "will work for you."
  • Test whether or not System Restore will "undo" Service Pack 1 or if you will be able to go back to a previous install point before Service Pack 1 installation. My guess is "No, you cannot."

With that said, this is my recommendations:

  • No matter what, I would recommend to install SP1. If for nothing else, the knowledge that all of the "security" updates are current, not to mention the "bug" fixes.
  • Back up everything you cannot afford to lose.
  • Contact Microsoft for any Technical issues that arise with the Service Pack 1. I do not work for them. I do not have a direct line to them. They can answer and fix your problems much faster than I.

Is there a way to change a Windows XP's Serial number without reinstalling the whole thing?

This question could be coming from a person that is using a Microsoft known pirated version of Windows XP Professional Corporate Edition. Since I have no way of verifying any claims made to me via E-Mail, I ignore all "questionable" requests for such type of information.

If you purchased a Legitimate copy of Windows, this should not occur and there would be no real reason to ever have to change your product ID or your serial number. Contact Microsoft Technical Support for assistance if you do have a valid reason to do such a task. The contact information is located in your manual that came with your particular version.

If you are using a pirated copy of Windows XP, please do not ask me for help. I will not answer any questions with regards to pirated software.


I just attempted to install Windows XP Service Pack 1 and it says I have a pirated copy! What do I do?

 

This problem is caused by using a Microsoft known pirated copy of Windows XP Professional Corporate Edition.

If you purchased a Legitimate copy of Windows, this should not occur. Contact Microsoft Technical Support for assistance. The contact information is located in your manual that came with your particular version.

If you are using a pirated copy of Windows XP, please do not ask me for help. I will not answer any questions with regards to pirated software.
 

How do I change the Automatic/Manual/Disabled function?!?

 

 

Changing a Service from the "Default" to "Something else."

 

http://www.blackviper.com/images/WinXP/ScreenShots/tweak1a.jpg


Start --> Control Panel -->

 

http://www.blackviper.com/images/WinXP/ScreenShots/tweak1b.jpg


Performance and Maintenance -->

 

http://www.blackviper.com/images/WinXP/ScreenShots/tweak1c.jpg


Administrator Tools -->

 

http://www.blackviper.com/images/WinXP/ScreenShots/tweak1d.jpg


Services -->

 

http://www.blackviper.com/images/WinXP/ScreenShots/tweak1e.jpg


Select "Any Service" -->
(Double Click)

 

http://www.blackviper.com/images/WinXP/ScreenShots/tweak1f.jpg 


Select "Automatic, Manual or Disabled."

 

After configuring all services, reboot to see the effects of your tweaking.

Note: Do not use msconfig to stop services. It basically is "disabling" a service. Use the above procedure and set to "manual" instead for testing purposes.

If you like, you can also do: Start --> Run --> type in services.msc --> Select OK.



Windows XP Services

The following 103 pages are in this category, out of 103 total.

A

    * Alerter
    * Automatic Updates

B

    * Background Intelligent Transfer Service

C

    * COM+ Event System
    * COM+ System Application
    * ClipBook
    * Computer Browser
    * Cryptographic Services

D

    * DCOM Server Process Launcher
    * DHCP Client
    * DNS Client
    * Distributed Link Tracking Client
    * Distributed Transaction Coordinator

E

    * Error Reporting Service
    * Event Log
    * Extensible Authentication Protocol Service

F

    * FTP Publishing
    * Fast User Switching Compatibility
    * Fax

H

    * HTTP SSL
    * Health Key and Certificate Management Service
    * Help and Support
    * Human Interface Device Access

I

    * IIS Admin
    * IMAPI CD-Burning COM Service
    * IPSEC Services
    * IPv6 Helper Service
    * Indexing Service

L

    * Logical Disk Manager
    * Logical Disk Manager Administrative Service

M

    * MHN
    * Media Center Receiver Service
    * Media Center Scheduler Service
    * Message Queuing
    * Message Queuing Triggers
    * Messenger
    * Microsoft Software Shadow Copy Provider

N

    * NT LM Security Support Provider
    * Net Logon
    * NetMeeting Remote Desktop Sharing
    * Network Access Protection Agent
    * Network Connections
    * Network DDE
    * Network DDE DSDM
    * Network Location Awareness (NLA)
    * Network Provisioning Service

P

    * Peer Name Resolution Protocol
    * Peer Networking
    * Peer Networking Group Authentication
    * Peer Networking Identity Manager
    * Performance Logs and Alerts
    * Plug and Play
    * Portable Media Serial Number Service
    * Print Spooler
    * Protected Storage

Q

    * QoS RSVP

R

    * RIP Listener
    * Remote Access Auto Connection Manager
    * Remote Access Connection Manager
    * Remote Desktop Help Session Manager
    * Remote Procedure Call (RPC)
    * Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Locator
    * Remote Registry
    * Removable Storage
    * Routing and Remote Access

S

    * SNMP Service
    * SNMP Trap Service
    * SSDP Discovery Service
    * Secondary Logon
    * Security Accounts Manager
    * Security Center
    * Server
    * Shell Hardware Detection
    * Simple Mail Transport Protocol (SMTP)
    * Simple TCP/IP Services
    * Smart Card
    * System Event Notification
    * System Restore Service

T

    * TCP/IP NetBIOS Helper Service
    * TCP/IP Printer Server
    * Task Scheduler
    * Telephony
    * Telnet
    * Terminal Services
    * Themes

U

    * Uninterruptible Power Supply
    * Universal Plug and Play Device Host

V

    * Volume Shadow Copy

W

    * WMI Performance Adapter
    * WebClient
    * Windows Audio
    * Windows Firewall/Internet Connection Sharing (ICS)
    * Windows Image Acquisition (WIA)
    * Windows Installer
    * Windows Management Instrumentation
    * Windows Management Instrumentation Driver Extension
    * Windows Time
    * Wired AutoConfig
    * Wireless Zero Configuration
    * Workstation
    * World Wide Web Publishing